Posts Tagged ‘deep fryer’

Thursday, August 29, 2013 @ 01:08 PM

CWTailgateTailgating season is about to go into full swing. Baseball season is winding down. Racing season is over the hump. Concert season is in full tilt. And the gridiron is about to heat up.

For those of us that are seasoned warriors of the blacktop party, we know the drill. For the newbies, crack your knuckles, grease those joints. It’s time to get cracking.

It is always nice to have a crew. Having more people to do stuff, help out and bring food and party goods is great. But that also means being more elaborate, having more food, more beverages, more stuff. More stuff means bigger and better means of cooking for the masses. That means not just the little grill that could. That little guy is for you and your partner or your best bud. You start getting into numbers and you need bigger and better. Not just grills either. Now is when you can get more creative. Get a stock pot and outdoor propane cooker. Make a big pot of chili. Steam lobsters and clams. You can even deep fry a turkey for those, on or close to, Thanksgiving Day games.

FF2SuperIf you really have a big crew, you may even want to upgrade from a conventional turkey fryer to a safer fryer, like an FF2 Super by R & V Works. This is a 6 gal. deep fryer that you can deep fry just about anything in, including a 15 to 17 pound turkey. It’s safer for frying & it’s mobile. It has a rolling caddy so you can easily move it to where ever on the black top you want it. After cooking you can just leave the fryer cool while your in watching the game, with out the danger of someone bumping into it and knocking it over. After the game, just open the drain valve, attach a drain hose for convenience, and drain your frying oil right back into the original containers. The cooking compartment separates from the caddy for ease of transportation if you are short on height space. Easier use and clean up, means more time to hang with your friends and enjoy the game.

Having a larger fryer like this can add so much more depth to your tailgate menu. Now you can free up the stock pot and patio stove for corn on the cob and potatoes, or Philly Cheese steak, while deep frying French fries, or Buffalo wings in your Cajun Fryer. It doesn’t just have to be frozen burger patties or hot dogs on a rinky dink table top grill anymore. Let’s fire up this parking lot party and jam tailgating season into full gear!!

 

 

 

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Friday, December 16, 2011 @ 01:12 PM

Free shipping is a loaded phrase. 9 times out of 10 shipping is never really free. The product has already been marked up to include an amount sufficient to cover the costs of shipping. Many people see the words free shipping and will look no further. Honestly if they did looked a bit further, they may actually pay shipping to a company and actually pay LESS than if they go with a company that claims free shipping.

When a company marks up a product to cover shipping fees it is technically a crap shoot. The company needs to more or less pick a price that will cover shipping all over. Shipping in the same town for instance will be exactly the same as say from Florida to Alaska. Convenient for the long distance customer, not fair to the in town customer, and a crap shoot for the business.

Shipping companies actually don’t work that way. Distance is a major factor when it comes to pricing of shipping, as well as weight, over all size, even odd shaped products come into play. I have customers that find great pricing on the deep fryers that I sell. But for them to expect that a 300 lb. outdoor propane deep fryer‘s great price includes shipping is just wrong. An item like this will ship freight. It does not go into a typical brown, yellow, or white truck that you see every day. It ships in a large cargo truck or even a tractor trailer. Diesel prices are quite high right now. There is usually a fuel surcharge on almost anything that gets shipped nowadays. Besides, a 300lb. grill or deep fryer that ships across one state compared to the shipping price of a unit that ships across 50 states is quite a major difference.

So anyway, keep this thought in mind when making a purchase on line. Just because someone says free shipping, it doesn’t mean that you are getting the best deal. Take a little more time and get the best deal, not just because it says it’s FREE>

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Monday, November 14, 2011 @ 02:11 PM

Don’t have time to deep fry a turkey on Thanksgiving Day? Want to have deep fried turkey at a tailgate but don’t want to lug a deep fryer to the stadium? You can always get out your turkey fryer ahead of time, deep fry your bird, store it in the refrigerator, and then reheat the turkey when the time is right.

Reheating directions for deep fried turkey:

Remove the turkey from the refrigerator or cooler 3-4 hours before reheating to allow it to come to room temperature. This will decrease the amount of time it takes to reheat your bird. Place the turkey in preheated 250 degree F. oven or grill for 30 minutes for a 10-12 lb. turkey.  (Time may vary depending on size of turkey)
For microwave re-heating:

Remove any foil from around the turkey.  Place a damp cloth around the bird and heat for 10-15 minutes.  If the turkey is already sliced, place in microwave safe dish and place loosely crumpled damp paper towels on top of the turkey.  (Time may vary according to size of turkey and microwave wattage)

Of course reheating is never the same as right out of the fryer, but it’ll do in a pinch.

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Monday, November 7, 2011 @ 11:11 AM

Tailgating is an art. It can be low key, it can be fancy and over the top. But simple or fancy we are all looking for anything to make this art run as smoothly & easily as possible. This is an homage to all those dedicated fans out there. Whether you’re a race fan, college team fan, pro team fan or you’re just looking for a nice day at the beach. We salute you! So pop the tailgate on the back of your truck and lets get cooking!

The history of tailgating goes all the way back to Ancient Rome. Food and wine were sold outside of the Colosseum for gladiator events and chariot races. There was also food & drink served at jousting tournaments in medieval Europe.
Tailgating has now become an American phenomenon tracing it’s roots back to The Battle of Bull Run in1861 where some Union supporters brought picnic baskets out to watch the first battle of the Civil War. The first college football game ever played in America was also host to tailgating with Rutgers & Princeton playing against each other while people grilled fish & wild game. When Harvard & Yale played against each other, the walk from the train to the field was so long, the people brought picnic lunches with them. Now in the 21st century, tailgating is in full swing. More than 20 million Americans tailgate every year. Some stadiums and race tracks even have a special areas just for tailgaters.

The Weather Channel has recently been focusing on many different tailgating groups. They actually had one program totally devoted to what college football teams that they thought had the best set of tailgaters. There were even some tailgaters that come by boat as their stadium is located right on the water. They tie all of the boats together and just start tailgating!!

The Weather Channel also likes to focus on food choices of tailgaters. My favorites are always the groups that prefer to “eat the competition”. In other words, say the team is playing against Baltimore…they make crab cakes. If they play against a New England team they make lobster rolls or have a New England lobster boil that they steamed in their turkey fryer. Therefore essentially eating the competition before the game even starts.

Tailgating is not just confined to the college or pro football stadium parking lot. It can be a day at the beach or an afternoon in the park. Baseball fans, horse racing fans & concert goers are all potential tailgaters. The Kentucky Derby has turned into a major tailgating venue with pomp & circumstance, seer sucker suits & big hats. And then, there were The Parrotheads. Jimmy Buffett fans have more generators to power blenders than any other tailgaters I know. And lest we not forget The Grateful Dead fans that not only went to one concert, but followed The Dead around the country for a whole tour. I bet there were some very interesting food choices along the road when it came to months of traveling.

That being said, tailgating is obviously not confined to just a single event or day. Some sports fans just come to watch the game and sometimes leave early to beat the traffic if the score is not going their way. Race fans are devotees. They come and stay for days, sometimes even weeks during Speed Week. That’s a lot of food to plan for and race fans are serious about their food. This is not just NASCAR fans either. There are lots of drag racing & road course fans out there. Many of these venues are weekend long events. Some people show up on Thursday & don’t leave until Monday morning after breakfast, which is sometimes the last great tailgate. All of the leftovers and the last of the eggs and bacon come out and are still made into a culinary masterpiece.

The perfect piece of equipment, your latest perfected recipe, the coolest new game can set you apart from the rest of the lot. So many set ups and different things to cook. For some people the food is as important as the game. Some people don’t even go in to watch the event. They stay outside for the party and watch the game on TV. Any good tailgate is not just burgers and dogs. Brats, ribs, chili, steak, deep fried turkey, pork loin, beer can chicken are many favorites. The gadgets that go along with all that food are phenomenal too. Not just grills. Coolers, blenders, kegorators, deep fryers, crock-pots, BBQ smokers, even woks. Tents, couches, easy chairs, lawn games are all common place at a tailgate. There are even highly elaborate homemade & professionally made tailgate trailers with cooking equipment, TV’s & sound systems included.

Part of the art of a good tailgate party comes from proper planning and knowing your grill, BBQ smoker, and cooking equipment. Knowing how many people your cooking for is helpful in pre planning your shopping list(and a little extra never hurts.) Get to know your grill and cooking equipment. Use it at home. Get used to your hot spots and cooking zones. Don’t try out a deep fryer for the first time at the track! When you transport your grill, if you don’t have an enclosed trailer to put it in, put it right behind the cab of your truck with the hinged side of the lid to the backside of the cab. Tie it securely! If you loose your lid, your dead in the water.

Some important things to remember about tailgating is having the right stuff you need to make your life easier. Of course you don’t always need everything but if you can get yourself a big plastic bin and fill it with some of these items you’ll be ready to roll at a moments notice. Just always remember to replenish.

•    Grill tools & can opener
•    Meat Thermometer
•    Sharp Knife & Serving Spoons
•    Plastic utensils to eat with
•    Aluminum foil & baggies
•    Salt, Pepper, Your Favorite Seasonings & Rubs
•    Trash Bags
•    Paper Towels(Cloth towels & wash cloths)
•    Stuff to eat off of, Paper or Plastic Plates, Bowls, Whatever

A jug of water is nice to have to clean your hands with. (Soap is good too.) Foil pans are handy for all sorts of things:cooking, storing, serving & leftovers. Whatever your cooking apparatus, it never hurts to have extra fuel. . . propane, charcoal, wood chips. A fire extinguisher is a great thing to bring along & a squirt bottle for small flare ups. Cutting boards are good, but paper plates make nice clean cutting surfaces. Condiments, olive oil, non-stick cooking spray, onions & garlic are necessity. A table to cut up stuff on and set the food on when its done is always a nice option. A fold up chair or two is great to have too when your taking a break from cooking or after the game when your waiting for the parking lot to clear out a little. Extra beer is always plus. . . it’s a great bartering tool if you forgot something at home. ALWAYS make sure you have a good cooler & PLENTY of ice! Lastly. . . NEVER leave your grill or fryer unattended besides the obvious safety reasons your food can get ruined in a heartbeat! PS…use sober, common sense while cooking.

So, yes, tailgating is an art. It doesn’t matter who you’re routing for either. A great tailgate can bring everyone together. But tailgating is still about one upping your neighbor. (Some people even have cooking competitions right at the venue they are at. I was at a weekend long drag racing competition and a whole group of people came just to have a rib cooking competition). It’s never about putting anyone down. It’s the pride of knowing you’re better. From simple to elaborate, regional favorites like Philly Cheese Steak & Buffalo wings, or just showing off, like grilled tequila & chipotle rubbed butterflied leg of lamb. Deep frying turkey for the Thanksgiving Day game and bringing all of the fixings. . From your tailgate bed or your buddy’s RV. Breakfast to dessert with appetizers & dinner in between, beer to blender drinks. Tailgating is about fun times and making memories. So have fun, enjoy yourself & eat hearty!

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Wednesday, October 26, 2011 @ 10:10 AM

Using a Bayou Classic turkey fryer or any traditional turkey fryer at Thanksgiving can cut your cooking time down immensely. Imagine taking a 14 lb. bird and having to roast it for almost 5 hours at 20 mins. perpound. Take that same bird, stick it in a deep fryer with the oil at 350 degrees F for 3 mins. per pound, plus an extra 5 mins at the end for good measure, and your Thanksgiving dinner is ready in less than an hour. There are always proper safety measures that you want to take, like reading your manual. Wear appropriate clothing, shoes, and have protective gloves. Here are a few other tips to make your holiday meal a

success.

First let’s use the following information to determine the proper size turkey to buy for your fryer’s stock pot size.

Estimate cooking time by the formula of 3 minutes per pound of turkey. So if you have a 10 lb. turkey you will fry it for 30 mins. plus add an extra 5 mins. at the end.

What kind of oil should you buy? You want an oil with a high smoke point. That means an oil that is going to hold a constant high temperature with out hitting the point that it starts to smoke and then hit flash point. Refined peanut oil has a high smoke point, 450 degrees F. Some people are allergic to peanut oil, though I heard that the more refined the more hypo-allergenic, but to be on the safe side, if you don’t know for sure, get some other form of vegetable oil. Besides peanut oil can be expensive. Corn oil and high oleic canola oil are more readily available, have a good smoke point, and are less expensive than peanut oil.

How much oil should you use? Measuring the oil is quite simple. Take the completely thawed bird, place it in the stock pot. Fill the pot with water to the fill line. Place the bird in the perforated basket or on the poultry rack that you will be using. Place everything in the pot. Fill your stock pot with water until the bird is covered, plus a LITTLE extra. Remove the turkey and rack or basket. Mark your water line. This is how much oil to use. Dry the pot and basket completely before adding the oil.

Make sure your fryer is sturdy, level ground or concrete, not in your garage or covered wooden deck, away from combustible materials. If windy, place your propane tank upwards of the wind, so that the flame is blowing away from the LP gas.

Make sure your cooker will not be in a walk through area.

Make sure the kids, the dog, and any possibly non-sober guests have somewhere else to play!

While the frying oil is heating up, dry your turkey completely. Please make sure your turkey is properly thawed. Cooking times may vary if your poultry has not been properly thawed. Rule of thumb is to get the bird to room temp. an hour prior to deep frying. Sometimes a cold or frozen spot in a joint or deep in the turkey breast won’t allow that section to cook  properly. Besides ice crystals left on the bird can cause a huge boil over and flare up.

Before you insert your turkey in the pot, make sure that your thermometer is working properly. Make sure you have all your tools handy in close reach. NEVER LEAVE THE DEEP FRYER UNATTENDED! Handy tools should include a

meat thermometer, a bucket of sand and/or an all purpose fire extinguisher. No hoses! Hot oil and water don’t mix.

Clean and dry poultry inside & out. Remove giblets and neck, and trim away all excess fat and skin.(This stuff makes good gravy stock. Set it to boil, then simmer while the turkey is frying. While the turkey cools, strain the liquid from the giblets, add some water and corn starch. Heat and stir until thickened. Instant turkey gravy.) Make sure opening around the neck cavity is wide and clear. Make a 1-inch cut in the skin at the leg-thigh joints. This allows oil to drain when the turkey is done.
Inject your bird with seasonings if you prefer. Place your turkey in a roasting pan. A trick that I learned from “The BBQ Dr.” is to cover your bird with plastic wrap. This will keep the marinade from splashing back at you. Fill your seasoning injector. Pierce right through the plastic wrap into the turkey. The important thing to remember is to inject the turkey all over. Put a little in each hole.  Make sure you distribute the injection evenly so you don’t get pockets of the marinade. Push plunger down slowly while pulling injector out of meat to give even distribution of seasoning. Inject into various points on the breast, thighs, and drumstick. Even do the wings.  Flip your bird over, cover with plastic wrap, and inject the bottom side as well. There are portions of the breast that you may have missed by just injecting from the top side. Many people do the injection process the night before or early morning of. Some people like to use rubs as well, but much of the rub will come off during the cooking process, that is why injected seasonings are preferred. When using a dry powder marinade, mix with orange juice instead of water. The acidity in the orange juice enhances the marinade, plus it acts as a meat tenderizer. Wipe off any marinade they may have run with paper towels. You want to make sure that your turkey is nice and dry before lowering it into the hot frying oil.

Place turkey upside down on rack, with legs facing up. Remember, poultry legs facing up.  Put your measured frying oil into the pot. Attach thermometer to the top edge, making sure the stem of the thermometer is in the oil at least one inch… very important! When the oil is 350 degrees to 375°F it is time to place the turkey in the pot. Depending on the amount of oil used & weather conditions, it may take from 15 to 25 minutes for the oil to reach 350°F-375°F. You want to start the temp. a little higher than the optimum of 350 because your oil will drop in temp when you add the bird. Attach the grab hook to the top loop of the rack. Wearing protective gloves, very slowly & carefully lower poultry into pot. Almost like steeping a tea bag. The oil will spit and bubble at this point. Take your time until you are able to settle the turkey to the bottom without creating a severe boil over. It may take 60-90 seconds to completely lower poultry into the oil! If you feel more comfortable using two people for this process, get yourself a lift bar that two people can hold at the same time. Also, if you are afraid of a boil over and grease fire, just at the time of insertion, shut off the burner, slowly tea bag your turkey into the oil. When all is settled, relight the burner.

Now monitor your temp. As I said the oil temp. will drop a bit. Get it back to 350. You want to maintain that temp. as close as possible. Control frying temperature by turning the valve on the hose & regulator assembly. Reduce the flame to maintain a constant. PS: After passing 450°F, cooking oil can heat up rapidly to its flashpoint of spontaneous combustion, which is a serious grease fire! Therefore, never leave cooker unattended! Constantly monitor your thermometer. When the bird is done, turn the cooker off at the tank. Leaving pot on cooker, place grab hook through top loop of the rack and very carefully remove rack, with your turkey, from pot. Place rack with poultry on absorbent paper and allow to drain for few minutes, then remove from basket or rack and place on a platter to cool before carving. As I said, now is a great time to thicken the gravy and finish up your side dishes.

One last thing to keep in mind is your propane. Have an extra tank handy just in case. You do not want to run out halfway through a deep frying session.

Have fun, be safe. Use sober, common sense and you will have a Thanksgiving dinner to rival all your past ones.

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Tuesday, October 25, 2011 @ 08:10 AM

As the lesson on turkey fryers comes to a close, we now come to the safer fryer. These are larger outdoor propane deep fryers that you can fry many things, but if so inclined, you can deep fry a turkey. Two companies that manufacture these type of fryers are R & V Works who make the Cajun Fryer, and Bayou Classic that make the Bayou Fryer. Both are quite similar in design, a V shaped bottom with a squared cooking compartment made of steel.

What makes these fryers safer, is that unlike the open exposed flame and pot of bubbling oil of a traditional turkey fryer, these units have a self contained flame. The ignition port is usually at the side or the back of the unit. The flames run through the oil in the cooking compartment in self contained metal tubes. As the metal heats, it in turn heats the frying oil. And, yes it does get hot enough to heat the oil to deep fry anything you want, even a whole turkey. Any spillage, bubbling oil or splash back that may occur would come out of the front of the unit, not down the side, or out of the back, therefore no hot oil and flame should ever come in contact. Thus, a safer fryer.

The V shaped bottom helps to keep the oil fresher longer. The oil below the tubes tends to stay much cooler. Any food particles that may fall to the bottom are not in hot, scorching oil. The food particles won’t burn, therefore keeping the oil from getting that burned carbon flavor.

You can recoup the investment of your cooking oil in no time, by filtering your oil after about every 5 uses. All of the units come with a drain valve to aid in this purpose. A piece of radiator hose from the auto parts store and an appropriate fitting attached, will help you filter your cooled oil back into the original containers, allowing you to strain out any food particles as well. If you don’t have a proper oil filtering and straining system, take your time with a funnel and a coffee filter and you are good to go. If you are tailgating, and don’t have time to let everything cool down properly, the use of metal Jerry cans can aid in this purpose. Before you go into the football game, carefully drain the hot oil into metal Jerry cans and place them off to the side or away. This will also help the deep fryer to cool down quicker so that people walking through the parking lot to get into the stadium will not be bumping into a hot metal fryer.

The safer fryers come in many sizes, from 2 1/2 gallon all the way up to a large 17 gallon fryer that is technically two 8 1/2 gallon fryers welded together on one stand. You can not cook a whole Thanksgiving bird in a 2 1/2 gallon unit though. Any unit ranging 6 gallons and up though, would be perfect for turkey. There are even specially modified frying baskets that help fit a turkey into a 6 gallon Cajun Fryer or larger.

If you love deep fried turkey, but don’t want to deep fry a bird in the house in a counter top deep fryer, or have a roasted turkey in an oil-less “turkey fryer”, and are still leery of the conventional turkey fryer, than a safer fryer is for you. You can deep fry everything from apple fritters to zeppoles in these fryers. Great for tailgate parties, camping, a Friday night fish fry at the church, or even for starting up a mobile catering business. Just spray down the inside of the unit with some spray cooking oil when not in use put a cover on it and store it in the garage or shed.

Deep fried turkey has become an American passion. If you have been thinking about getting a turkey fryer, do your research before you decide what fryer is right for you. You don’t just have to buy a traditional turkey fryer. There are lots of different options out there. Become informed and whatever you do go with, remember to read your manual, follow the directions, be safe, and use sober, common sense.

PS. Always remember to have an extra tank of propane on hand. You don’t want to run out in the middle of deep frying your Thanksgiving dinner!!

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Wednesday, October 5, 2011 @ 10:10 AM

Eating deep fried foods should not be an every day occurrence but lets face it we Americans do like our fried foods. Many Americans do actually have a deep fryer at home, whether it be of the counter top variety or a stove top cast iron deep fryer. Many folks have outdoor propane fryers or turkey fryers as well.

Making a choice to eat healthy foods, like salads and boneless, skinless, chicken breast are better for your cholesterol and blood pressure. Many people have to eat this way due to the high rate of obesity, diabetes, and high cholesterol in this country. But lets face it, eating healthier foods is expensive. Getting chopped meat that is 97% lean is pricey. Buying chicken breast that has been made boneless and skinless is also not cheap. Purchasing fresh fruits and vegetables is iffy due to the short shelf life. It’s not like you can freeze lettuce to use at a later date. You can always grow your own produce, which keeps down chemical exposure, to you and your family, but not every one has a green thumb, or a yard big enough to accommodate a big garden.

Mrs. Obama has been making an effort to get the country to slim down, grow a garden, and eat foods that are better for them. Many fast food restaurants are even jumping on the band wagon and offering healthier choices. But, lets face it, when you go out to a restaurant to eat, fast food or fancier, odds are in this economy that you are going to indulge yourself in fatty, comforting, deep fried, high caloric goodness. Many people can’t just afford to go out to eat anymore. When we do, why would you want to have roughage, tofu, and bulgar wheat when you can have a burger and french fries, or a steak and smashed potatoes with a slice of cheese cake for dessert? If you are eating healthier foods at home and on your lunch hour, you are certainly going to treat yourself if you are able to go out to eat. Besides, most fast food restaurants offer great deals on a combo burger and fry meal, where the healthier items are usually a bit more price wise.

There are many people in our country that are still out of work. Some have taken jobs way out of context to what they went to school for just so they can keep a roof over head and feed themselves and their families. I know a young man that has taken a job in retail at an electronics box store. He went to school to become a gym teacher or athletic coach. I know a woman that has been working in property management most of her life. She is now a cashier in a grocery store. I know a man that actually passed the bar exam. He now sells french fries at festivals and fairs. It can be a very trying experience when you were used to living a certain way or were expecting other things in your life.

People take comfort in deep fried, fatty foods. When your belly is full and it was something that tasted good, it can put a smile on your face and ease some tension from earlier in the day. The same old piece of grilled chicken and steamed broccoli is just not going to do that for you. People know that they should be eating healthy, but if a burger and fries can wash away your woes for a while once a week, then I say have at it!!

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Wednesday, September 21, 2011 @ 03:09 PM

Now that we’ve talked about indoor fryer safety, it’s time to move outdoors.

Having a turkey fryer or any outdoor propane deep fryer is fun. It adds flavor to your holidays. It’s an extra versatile cooking appliance for backyard barbecues, and a great added piece of cooking equipment for tailgaters. You can deep fry, steam, boil, simmer, and stew with a traditional turkey fryer. When it comes to hot oil and flames, always remember…safety first. This goes for any outdoor cooking equipment, but especially when frying oil, flames, and propane tanks are involved.

Now as I said having an outdoor fryer is fun, but it is also a serious business. Caution and common sense play a big role here.

Wearing appropriate clothes, like having shoes and sleeves are a great idea. Having all of the proper tools from your fryer kit right on hand is a necessity. You don’t need to search for the grab hook or basket lifter when the time comes to use it. Other important equipment to use and have on hand when using any outdoor propane deep fryer, are heavy duty long gloves,  safety goggles, a bucket of sand and an all purpose fire extinguisher. Remember…water and hot oil don’t mix. A hose used on any grease or oil fire can just make matters worse.

Always use your propane fryer outdoors. An open area is best, away from houses, garages, wooden decks, trees, and shrubs. Find a nice, flat, level piece of ground. Make certain that children and pets have another area to play in. You also want to be certain that your deep fryer will not be in a walk through area. Always make sure that there is at least 2 feet of space between your propane tank and the fryer burner. Make sure that no one is going to try to walk between the tank and the burner. Place your tank and fryer so that any wind will blow the heat of the burner and fryer away from your LP gas tank. Keep in mind that there are some  outdoor electric fryer units on the market. The same goes for these units. They are intended for outdoor use, not in your kitchen or on your wooden porch or deck. You also want to make sure that your cord will not get walked into, yanking the cord out of the wall or flipping your fryer over.

Never leave the fryer unattended. This goes for any type of deep fryer, indoors or outdoors. You always need to keep a careful watch during the deep frying process. If a grease fire occurs, turn off the gas immediately and cover the stock pot with a lid. Sand and again an all purpose fire extinguisher are great to have on hand. Also if your oil begins to smoke badly, immediately turn off the gas.

Being sober while deep frying is pretty important. You will have time afterward when the cooking is done and the oil has cooled or been stored away. Keeping your friends that are partying, safe and away from the hot oil is important too. Just like the kids and the dogs, make sure that any rowdiness, rough play or an over zealous drinkers have there own place far from gas tank lines, burners, and hot oil.

Make sure that your stock pot or Dutch oven is properly centered over your burner. You don’t want food or hot oil upending because the pan just wasn’t centered.

Remember to use the tea bag dunking method. Any time you add something in to hot oil, it is going to bubble and spit. Just dropping a turkey or whatever you are frying, right in to the stock pot is just asking for trouble. This will result in a major boil over and a possible fire hazard. If you are really worried, when the time comes to put the turkey in the pot, shut the burner off for a couple of minutes until your bird or other food, is safely nestled in the pot. Then turn the burner back on.

Always give your fryer proper time to cool down before straining or disposing of the oil. Even though the unit is turned off, the oil will remain hot for quite a while. You still need to keep the kids, big and small, and dogs away from it while it cools. With a traditional turkey fryer, get a battery operated pump or enlist a friend or two to help strain and funnel the oil. The oil can be used again if stored properly. Once the oil is cooled, you can strain and funnel the oil into storage containers with ease. If tailgating, funnel empty warm oil into clean, metal Gerry Cans. The cans will still be hot but they may be stored out of high traffic areas. The fryer will cool down quicker allowing you to put it away sooner. That way you may enter the stadium and enjoy the game, without the danger of someone stumbling into your hot fryer while you are away from it.

Don’t be scared of your deep fryer. Have fun with it! Just use caution, think safely and use sober, common sense.

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Tuesday, September 20, 2011 @ 09:09 AM

Using caution while deep frying, whether indoor with a Presto counter top deep fryer or an outdoor propane deep fryer, is just common sense. And using your own common sense will often help with being cautious and staying safe.

Always use your indoor deep fryer indoors. When using a counter top deep fryer you should always position your fryer well back from the edge on an even, level, cooking surface, table or counter top. Do not let the cord drape over the edge of the counter or table. Keep the cord out of reach of children and out of walk through areas.

Always make sure that foods are properly thawed before deep frying. Ice crystals on frozen chicken wings can cause a boil over of hot oil that you will be cleaning up for days!

Try to dry any wet or watery foods as water and oil don’t mix. When wetness hits the hot frying oil, splattering will occur. Remove excess moisture by blotting wet foods with paper towels.

Use good oil or all purpose shortening for deep frying. Deep frying foods in butter, margarine, or animal fat is not a good idea due to the low smoking point. (A smoking point is the temperature at which the fat or oil begins to break down and produce bluish smoke. After smoke point you near the flash point. Flash point is where the the oil ignites. Since deep frying foods is a very high temperature process, it requires a fat or oil with a high smoke point, like refined soybean or peanut oil.)

Always preheat your frying oil. Your oil should be at a proper temperature before lowering foods into the cooker. If the oil is not at a proper temperature to deep fry, your food will absorb oil instead of creating a protective barrier that cooks food, seals moisture in and crisps the outside. Also do not overload your fryer basket, as too many items at one time can also significantly lower the temperature of the cooking oil and allow for oil absorption. Frying pieces that are similar in size will also help in getting everything fried around the same time, rather than having to leave smaller pieces in the basket until the larger pieces finish cooking. Remember that smaller amounts of food will cook faster, so placing uniform pieces in a single layer in the bottom of the basket will result in quicker and more even browning and doneness.

Always work slowly when lowering a fryer basket into hot oil. NEVER drop the basket in. You should dip the basket like steeping a tea bag, until the oil settles down. This also helps keep some of the food from getting totally fried together. Dunk the basket raise it and shake a little to separate any pieces that have a potential to be deep fried together. Then continue this process until you can safely submerge the basket completely without an oil boil over.

Always use the equipment that comes with your fryer, like the basket and the lift/drain hook. Always wear protective gloves and having protective eye gear is a great safety measure as well.

NEVER leave your deep fryer unattended. This goes for turkey fryers, safer fryers, counter top fryers, and stove top deep fryers. You always need to keep a careful watch during the deep frying process. Should a grease fire occur, turn off gas immediately and cover the pot with a lid. Most counter top units have an emergency release cord, so unplug and cover. Baking soda and an all purpose fire extinguisher are great to have with electric fryers.

Deep frying food is tasty and fun. Using caution and common sense while deep frying can make for a very pleasant culinary experience.

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Monday, September 12, 2011 @ 12:09 PM

Fall is in the air. It’s time for tailgating again. Time to pump up that tailgate menu of yours.Why not add a deep fryer to your tailgate gear?

Scared of taking a deep fryer to your next tailgate party? There are plenty of safer fryers out there that are worthy of the stadium parking lot.

A perfect example is The Cajun Fryer by R & V works. These fryers are portable outdoor propane deep fryers. They are made safer by their design & construction. Metal tubes inside these fryers contain the flames, but still get the oil perfectly hot enough to fry whatever you like. Any spillage that may occur would happen in the front of the fryer, well away from any exposed flame. Therefore, no oil should ever touch the flames. And, as I said, they are portable. Wheels with a rolling caddy. The Cajun Fryers can actually be removed from the caddy for easier transport, storage, and for table tailgating. They can also be made with special trailer mounts should you decide that you want to permanently attach your fryer to a tailgating trailer.

Cajun fryers come in many different sizes too. From a 2 1\2 gallon for smaller tailgates, perfect for wings for your group, all the way up to a 17 gallon size. The 17 gallon size, or FF6, is technically 2- 8 1\2 gallon fryers put together. 6 baskets, 3 for each side. If you have a larger tailgate going on you are able to use the whole unit. If you have a smaller crowd or away game that not everyone could make, just fire up one side. There are plenty of other sizes in between.

If you are worried about hot oil being left in your fryer while you are in the stadium, no worries. After the oil cools a little, you just need a radiator hose and an appropriate hose end. Attach it to the drain valve & store the oil in  cleaned, metal Gerry Cans. The metal will still be hot, but you will be able to store it out of harms way while you and your friends enjoy the game.

Traditional turkey fryers are great too.  Turkey fryers are very versatile. The big stock pot allows you not only to deep fry in them, you can also steam, boil, stew, etc. Steam up a bunch of corn on the cob while you are cooking steaks on the grill. Make chili or sausage and peppers for the big game. Steam up some lobster before the Race to The Chase. The options are endless. Deep fry a turkey for the pre-game party. Great for those Thanksgiving Day games!

This holds true for All-In-One cookers too. Not only can you deep fryer, steam, boil, and stew, these units are also a bbq smoker & grill. Everything you need to change up your tailgating menu throughout the season!

So, why not take a Cajun deep fryer tailgating? Your team playing against Buffalo? Make Buffalo wings. Eat the competition before the game even starts!! Deep fry some mozzarella sticks for that Cheese Head game. Fry up some catfish for A Ragin’ Cajun game. Eagles fans…make up a mess of Philly Cheese steaks. Your menu can be as imaginative as you are. Get out there and start cooking!

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